About your Search

20120930
20121008
SHOW
Book TV 13
Today 7
( more )
STATION
CSPAN2 33
CSPAN 31
CNN 26
CNNW 26
FOXNEWS 24
MSNBCW 24
MSNBC 23
KGO (ABC) 11
WJLA 9
WRC 9
CNBC 8
KQED (PBS) 8
FBC 7
KRCB (PBS) 7
WETA 7
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 330
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 334 (some duplicates have been removed)
the best workforce... in the world by preparing a hundred thousand additional... math and science teachers; training two million... americans with the job skills they need atat our community... colleges; cutting the growth of tuition in hf and... expanding student aid so more americans can afford it. fourth, a balanced plan to reduce our deficit by... four trillion dollars over the next decade, on top of the... trillion in spending we've already cut. i'd ask the wealthy to pay a little more. and as we end the war in afghanistan... let's apply half the savings to pay down our debt and... use the rest for some nation-building... right here at home. it's time for a new economic patriotism, rooted in the... belief that growing our economy begins with a strong... thriving middle class. read my plan. compare it to governor romney's,and decide for yourself. thanks for listening. i'm barack oma and i approve this message. >> you are watching abc 7 news at 5:00, on your side. >> today marks the tenures since the terrifying day when there was a shooting -- today marks 10 years since th
a group of political science students from san jose state who watched the debate together last night downtown. after it was all over, even some of the president's biggest supporters in the room, yeah, they had to admit, romney gets the slight edge. >> overall, romney from my perspective did a little bit better. he wasn't as specific as obama, but he set out to attack obama more. >> a political science professor from san jose state telling us, she thinks romney will get a nice bump in the polls from that debate. she adds whether that bumps come in the all-important swing states where the race is still very tight that, remains to be seen. >>> here's a question, historically how much impact do presidential debates have on an election when it's all said and done? we asked that question to a professor of political science at santa clara university. >> that's a good question. in 2004, john kerry won the first debate against president bush. and in 1984, reagan stumbled in the first debate against mondale and it didn't seem to hurt them very much. it will be interesting to see as the polls c
see more young men and majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature. fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofit. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more than an investment banks in computer science. there isn't any reason that these two group should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man at a woman in an investment bank though that goldman sachs should be paid the same. they are paid the same and if they are not there are avenues to sue. but that is the big difference. >> what do you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> well i think the white house leak has a counsel on men and boys because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than
sciences and biotech discoveries. -- vio lifbio life scientists ad biotech discoveries. u2 -- for making that a cause for future generations and we will discover in that corridor those live science drugs that will help us end these dreadful diseases for generations to come. thank you, lieutenant governor. [applause] i wanted to welcome the delegates who come here under the leadership of the vice minister and of course in his capacity as not only the vice ministry of commerce, but also the china investment and promotion agencies and to the many companies are here in attendance, you represent that cross-section of companies from diverse backgrounds and discipline throughout the bay area. i want to welcome you here to this great seminar to wish you a great conversation and an intelligent one, and one that hopefully will discuss the many more ways that we can not only do business, but to work together to solve the world's problems. this is what happens here in san francisco. we cannot just talk about the problems. we will try to discover ways to solve them. this is, i think, the essence of w
the arts and sciences. there is luther burbank and jack london. there was a thing on the side. it says federal art project and has beginning and ending date. that is a wall which becomes a tomb stone. the artists themselves are becoming ghosts. that's what he's doing there. joseph danish. head of the projects, it is it was a wonderful time that he woke up every morning wondering how long it would last. they were being paid to produce public art. well, what happened of course is the war. the war came along. and roosevelt could see it coming. so, very few people understand the new deal segways into war. they beefed up the military bases like fort mason. my 1943, they are all killed. the war did what the new deal couldn't do, full employment. there were reports, it's still with mind numbing statistic. we have to rely on other people to do it. the these projects enriched the lives of millions of people and does so today all the time. i have become aware of it, but very few people are. i have also become aware extraordinary people. here's a dedication of roosevelt. on the left, who painted
it to have our public policy be guided less about compromise and more about science. [applause] and buy accurate public policy analysis, studies that show things like what are the awards reaped from investment in public funding of contraception? what do we gain from that? what are the consequences if we do not? it has been disappointing to see the ways in which science has been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming in for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. that is a scary moment. regardless of how you feel about abortion and your personal or legal beliefs, to require medical professionals to mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country. those type of scientific facts and accurate analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think it is fair to ask this question. i received some e-mails from constituents and others who sa
lab. the author of the sushi economy pulls the curtain that of the operatives that use social science to determine the outcome of elections. >> host: well, sasha this is a provocative and timely look as we are weeks away from the election. i want to know how did you come to want to write this book? >> guest: i covered campaigns beginning in philadelphia, so i was paying more attention to sort of tactics and techniques in the physical world of campaigns just because in the big city so much attention was being paid to the vote counted and precinct targeted so i talked to people that were making tv ads and i was always shocked as i think anybody that spent time on the campaigns is that most people couldn't explain to me why they did anything that they were doing. how do you know that and why do you do that and at some point they did it because the it always done it that we were they had some sort of a rule that wasn't based on any research. so some sort of skepticism about a lot of practices that were taking place and the way people were spending money and devoting time and resources and
dignitaries cut a piece of crime scene tape to officially open the new lab. >> forensic sciences will specialize particularly in dna testing, firearms and fingerprints and will have a fully functioning public health lab as well. >> reporter: gone are the days when evidence collected from rape victims sat on shelves untested and dna from cold cases went unanalyzed. >> it was a lot of work and i lot of advocacy. but can i tell you why i'm really here? i'm here for the moms of homicide victims who they labored so long and so hard to try to get this lab built and victims of sexual assault who were victimized twice when their rape kits weren't tested. >> reporter: kathy patterson help put the lab's initial pieces in place. first two floors of the building house the crime lab where firearms will be tested and fingerprints examined. the dna lab, which for the last two years occupied space in lorton, now has a permanent home. an entire floor will house the city's morgue where autopsies will be done. there is even a toxicology lab. >> to reduce this to what it is all about, it is more lik
it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies that show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having everyone be insured as a society and what as a society do we gain from that, what is the consequences if we don't? it's been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science has really been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. and that's a scary moment regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal or legal beliefs are about that. to require medical professionals to mislead their patients is not where we should be as a country, and i think those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think i
is in decline. researchers at the australian institute of marine science say the reef has lost half of its coral cover over the past 27 years. there are multiple causes, including a destructive kind of starfish shown here. we look at what's behind it and what's at stake-- in australia and around the world-- with nancy knowlton, a coral reef biologist and a chair of marine science at the smithsonian national museum of natural history here in washington. welcome. >> thanks. how has all of this coral died off? do we know what's causing it? is it all that... >> it's not all the star fish. the star fish is about 42%. typhoons, big strong storms another 48% and then coral bleaching is the remaining 10% which is caused whenever the water gets too hot. >> ifill: so this is human causedded? >> yes. most of it is human caused. i mean a coral reef naturally goes through cycles of up and down. but it shouldn't be declining by half over course of 27 years. >> ifill: i feel like we have talked before about the declining coral cover. but not... but i'm wondering whether it's now picking up speed or whether thi
's not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointeted d in the expectations that he has for himself. >> tonight the anticipation growing, about the one and only debate between the vice-presidential nominee. gas prices may be high in your hometown, but they just hit a record in one state, and keep climbing. could what's driving up the cost in california happen closer to you? and a driver plows right into a liquor store, whoa. imagine being one of the people inside. and watching that struck get away. ♪ >> i'm harris falkner, we begin tonight in florida, with the republican presidential nominee for president spending a third straight day in that state which is up for grabs. governor mitt romney at an earlily in port st. lucie and he has a major address on foreign policy tomorrow at the virginia military institute and then the governor making a promise about taxes. >> a study came out this week that showed with all his spending, and all of his borrowing and all the interest on at that debt, that he will ultimately have to raise taxes on middle income families by 4,000 a y
best educated and best trained workers in the world. that is why we trained 1000 more mass and science teachers. -- that is why we insisted on 100,000 more math and science teachers. we need that. we want to recruit these folks fifth as community colleges, we know we can create 2 million american workers and give them the skills for the high-tech manufacturing jobs of the future. there are 600,000 jobs in america in tech today. that is why we paired up with community colleges, creating thousands and thousands of decent paying jobs, but they oppose it. [applause] we are going to cut the growth of college tuition in half. in the next four years. [cheers and applause] we have already reduced the deficit. in four years, we will reduce it by another $1 trillion. ladies and gentlemen,there is an easy way to do this. we have to make some difficult decisions. we have to ask fifth very wealthy to pay more. ladies and gentlemen, we are going to end the war in afghanistan as we did in iraq. [cheers and applause] in the process, over the next decade, save over $800 million fifth we are going to c
. and our motto is where science meets community. our team does really cutting edge research on different kinds of prevention strategies, pre-exposure prophylaxis. and if you go to our website, join prep hiv, you'll see all of the many exciting studies that we have as well as our partnership with san francisco city clinic in launching the first demonstration project of pre-exposure prophylaxis, taking antihiv medicines to prevent new infections. we're studying topical gels, retro microbicide. the way we're going to end this epidemic is through a vaccine, we've controlled other infectious diseases through a cure. we're proud of our staff who contribute to this as well as the many study participants. and i'm just going to close with a quick word about the project. the way that this project came about was actually one of our staff members, janey vincent who is our graphic designer, you'll see some of her beautiful work inside, noticed that there was -- she's hiding. (applause) >> she noticed that president obama had designated part of his stimulus money to nih for the national institutes of
scouting out locations or a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." this is about 30 minutes. >> if we could have everybody in the back come on up that's going to join us. thank you so much for your patience. the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block was around as. apparently -- thank you. people are nodding, so that's good. thank you very much. there may be some people still held up and we will welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter earnest, executive director and i'll ask you as a courtesy, to those for recording the program and to the speakers, the kind enough to turn off your cell phones, pdas and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. well, it's wonderful to see all of you here for the signing, and as we kick off the signing, i will show you a clip of the film based on the book for which you came to attempt the signing. so with that said we will go right ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. >> [inaudible] >> has shocked the civilized world. more than 60 american citizens continue to be held as hostages. >> six
and secondary level with science education. liz: how do we get people to be interested in science and engineering? >> it takes good curriculum, good teachers and good schools. as we all know, teachers can make all the difference in turning on student curiosity. it really takes a whole number of things to really come together. liz: how to look at what is happening today? unemployment dropped to 7.8%. on the surface, it looks good, some people question it. what do you see out there in the trenches as a business leader? >> well, in all honesty, there are a lot of people who are unemployed, there are actually quite a few who are underemployed. there is no question the economy is not creating as many good, solid high-paying jobs. liz: they always ask business people what the problem is and they say uncertainty. >> i do not think it is as much uncertainty. you have to have an increase in demand of your products that justify the need for more manufacturing, more employees and there is a point in fact for us in 2012 our volume is less than it was last year. there is not a lot of justifica
of the new england institute for cognitive science, and he is cofounder of the new england institute for cognitive science, an evolutionary study. religious studies at the university of very good. he's been an unflagging student of how human beings make their way in the world, even though that way is often not pretty. he challenges each reader to tinker with their own wiring, to be aware, and he hopes to do better. for his profound insights into the human condition and into the conditions, some humans play some others, we present him the anisfield-wolf book award for nonfiction. [applause] ♪ the night this is wonderful and i deeply appreciate the fact that such a distinguished jury read my book, much less thought it worthy of this great honor. in a moment i am going to read you an excerpt from "less than human," which deals the course of the atrocities of the past. but i think it is useful to remind ourselves that the plaintiff considering atrocities that the path is to make a better future. if we can understand what has driven us to do the terrible thing we've done to our fellow h
to believe that science reduces humanity, that science gives you a bleak, cold, empty, barren view of the universe and of life. quite the contrary. science is enriching and fulfilling. what's going to happen when i die? if i met god, the unlikely event after i died, i think the first thing i would say is which one are you? are you zeuss, are you thor? which god are you? why did you take such great pains to conceal yourself and hide away from us. >> and you can see more fascinating interviews like this one online at our website, go to cnn.com/video and search red chair. up next, a story involving yard sales, a space launch and bobble head of president obama. can you figure it out? now from the maker of splenda sweeteners, discover nectresse. the only 100% natural, no-calorie sweetener made from the goodness of fruit. the rich, sweet taste of sugar. nothing artificial. ♪ it's all that sweet ever needs to be. new nectresse. sweetness naturally. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of american
of marine science says the pace of damages kicking up. cyclones of predatory starfish are the main causes along with: gas shipments and global warming. >> coral reefs provide the breeding ground for countless species of fish. the great barrier reef is no exception. commercial fishing is now mostly banned across much of the area. three 6 cents more than 2,600 kilometers along the us trillion coast. the northern part of the refinements largely intact. it is the southern part scientists are worried about. severe storms are said to have cost nearly 50 percent -- said to have caused nearly 50% of the damage. a further 40% was caused by starfish that feed on the coral. one species, the crown of thorns, has proven especially deadly for the coral cover. >> we believe if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorns starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of the climatic impact spite cyclone and coral bleaching. >> regardless of what is causing the damage, brain biologists say action needs to be taken now to save the r
to hire another 100,000 new math and science teachers. and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so that people can get trained for the jobs that are out there right now. and i want to make sure that we keep tuition low, for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree that our corporate tax rate is too high. so i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing, taking it down to 25%. but i also want to close those loopholes that are giving incentives for companies that are shipping jobs overseas, i want to provide tax breaks for companies that are investing here in the united states, on energy, governor romney and i both agree, we have to boost american energy production. and oil and natural gas production are higher than they have been in years. but i also believe that we have to look at the energy source of the future, like wind, solar and bio-fuels and make those investments. so all of this is possible. now, in order foritous do it, we to have to close our deficit. one of the think thises i am sure we will be discussing is how do
to uphold the constitution. >> reporter: rachel caufield is a professor of political science at drake university and a research fellow at the american judicature society. she thinks it's the family leader and other conservative groups around the country, that are inserting money and politics into the judicial system. >> i think we have a movement afoot to politicize our courts and in politicizing our courts i think basically that undermines the quality of justice in america. there's definitely a trend nationwide. we've seen a huge increase in campaign spending among judicial candidates, many of whom are supported by similar interest groups. >> reporter: according to the nonpartisan group called justice at stake, from 2000 to 2009, money spent on state supreme court justice races jumped more than two and a half times to over $206 million. in iowa in 2010, money spent, mostly from out of state totaled over $1.2 million to unelect the three justices there with ads like this -- >> if they can redefine marriage none of the freedoms we hold dear are safe from judicial activism. to hold acti
workforce... in the world by preparing a hundred thousand additional... math and science teachers; training two million... americans with the job skills they need at our community... colleges; cutting the growth of tuition in half and... expanding student aid so more americans can afford it. fourth, a balanced plan to reduce our deficit by... four trillion dollars over the next decade, on top of the... trillion in spending we've already cut. i'd asthe wealthy to pay a little more. and as we end the war in afghanistan... let's apply half the savings to pay down our debt and... use the rest for some nation-building... right here at home. it's time for a new economic patriotism, rooted in the... belief that growing our economy begins with a strong... thriving middldle class. read my pl. compare it to governor romney's, and decide for yoursel thanks for listening. i'm barack obama a and i approve this message.
dice mas. . fuse science ha desarrollado productos con avanzada tecnologia pensando en la comodidad del consumidor y en el alivio a coro plazo, un ejemplo de esto es el energel, un gel que produce alivio cuando hay dolor o fatiga muscular y algun tipo de proceso antinflamatorio en las articulaciones. tambien deportistas como tiger woods, big papi david ortiz, el pelotero de las medias rojas de boston jose bautista, nolan carroll de los miami dolphins, entre otros son aficionados del energel. http://www.fusescience. com yy en las tiendas naturistas gnc. hacemos una pausa: y cuando volvamos toda la informacion deportiva.. pero antes un adelanto con el socio!! como les va buenas tardes y buen inicio de semana para todos, fue un fin de semana de mucha actividad deportiva para los equipos del area que en dos disciplinas estan luchando por su clasificacion directa al playoff, y nuestro primer resumen tiene que ver con el iniciamos en el candem yard donde los orioles derrotaron 6-3 a los medias rojas y esperaron una victoria de texas ante los angelinos que no se concretó. luego de
katie club. we will tell you the warning science of bullying and how to intervene if your child is being harassed at school. a show every parent needs to watch. that's later on katie. >> that is 4:00 today here on abc 2. coming up, dramatic video to bring you this morning, you don't want to miss this. a massive fire caught on camera. how long crews had to work to get this mess under control. so, we all set? i've got two tickets to paradise! pack your bags, we'll leave tonight. uhh, it's next month, actually... eddie continues singing: to tickets to... paradiiiiiise! no four. remember? whoooa whooaa whooo! you know ronny, folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. and how happy are they jimmy? happier than eddie money running a travel agency. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. those spots are actually leftover food and detergent residue that can redeposit on your dishware during the rinse cycle. gross. jet-dry rinse agent helps wash them away so the only thing left behind is the shine. jet-dry rinses away residues fo
-old study by the australian institute of marine science finds that the reef has lost 50%. scientists say they are trying to stem the tide. >> this is actually fertilizer pollution, feeding the star fish. >> it grows among the most environmentally friendly in the world. >> conservationists say cutting the amount of fertilizer that is running off into the reef would make a big difference, similar to our efforts in our own backyard with the chesapeake bay. >> more problems for a set of metro escalators, but this time it's not what you think. >>> what a celebration it was at nationals park last night. washington still managed to win the national league east when atlanta fell to pittsburgh. >> fans are looking ahead to the playoffs. scot broom is live at the stadium with more. hi scott. >> that's correct. a couple more games against the phillies when it is off to the playoffs as national league east champions. fans are beside themselves, including a blast from the past. famed senator slugger, excuse me, famed senator slugger, howard. >> i think it's going to be great. >> he is 76 year
location for a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." it's about thirty minutes. if we can have nerve the back come on. thank you for your patience. we have -- the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block here was horrendous. apparently thank you, people are nodding. that's good. thank you very much. so there may be some people held up still. we'll welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter, the executive directer. ly ask you as a court sei those who are recording the program and the speakers to be kind enough to turn off your cell phone, pda and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. that said we'll go ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. the people die. we want the six of them out. what we want is -- deliver the six by providing them with -- you can send them training wheels and get them to the board we are gatorade. it would take a miracle to get them out. what are we watching? i have an idea. there are canadian film crew for science fiction. we file together as a company. this is how we make a big movie. you want to c
that suspects will get convicted, but there is good forensic science and it is more likely that innocent people will not be convicted if there is good forensic science and that is what this lab is about. >> and the crime lab is an independent lab and not answering to the chief of police. >> tony williams said it was his vision that got the project off the ground. >> tomorrow marks ten years since the d.c. sniper attacks began during the 3 week spree. the two were captured and convicted. mohammed was executed and roberts is serving a sentence. we covered the story back then, paul, and is there anything that sticks out in your mind. >> the lind -- the murder of linda franklin. a lady going about her business at the home depot, outside with her husband. and then if you recall there was one person who came forward and said he saw the sniper and was lying. and that sends people wondering, what was going on here? it was just such a frightening time. >> i think i remember when this broke and no one knew what was going on, i was sent to the location in aspen hill and i remember in the days afterwards a
and manufacturers who create jobs here in the united states. we need to recruit 100,000 math and science teachers, train two million workers at community college, bring down the cost of college tuition. we need to -- [cheers and applause] we need to cut our oil imports in half. create thousands more jobs in clean energy. we need to use the savings from ending the wars in iraq and afghanistan to help pay down our deficit and put people back to work doing some nation building right here at home. that's the agenda we need. that's how you strengthen the middle class. that's how you keep moving forward. that's the choice in this election. and that's why i'm running for a second term. that's what we need. now, my opponent has been trying to do a two-step and reposition and got -- got an extreme makeover. [applause] but the bottom line is his underlying philosophy is the top-down economics that we've seen before. he thinks that if we just spend another $5 trillion on tax cuts that yes, skewed toward the wealthiest, if we get rid of more regulations on wall street, then our problems will be solved. jobs
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "early start." an american astronaut about to hitch a ride with the russians up to the international space station. later this month, nasa's kevin ford will join two russian astronauts aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft that will blast them into orbit for a five-month stay. ford will join the station's current team and take over as expedition commander. this will mark for the second space flight and his first aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft. kevin ford is joining us live now from the cosmonaut training center in star city, russia, where he and his crewmates have been preparing for the mission. thank you for being with us. you will be at that time iss from the end of the month until march of next year. can you tell us what you will be doing while you are there? >> well, i can't tell you exactly what we will be doing but i can tell you what we plan to do. so we -- we hope to carry out a lot of science. we had a lot of trainin
that have not been here before, is a science and technology not for profit policy think tank if you will win the washington, d.c. area that focuses on how science and technology affect the national security. for quite some time we have studied issues in and around what people callasymmetric threats and most importantly, terrorism. this past year professor alexander and i released our second volume on al qaeda about 11 years after the first volume on al qaeda right before 9/11, and we would like to call your attention to it. there are copies available year and of course available on the web at amazon always good things and i want to highlight it today because it is more of a gift we are going to give to our panel members for taking the time of their busy schedules to the very least i can promise you a good sleep if you read it. [laughter] the second look at the potomac institute has been involved in over this past year is an effort with the bechtel corporation to look at the cyber issue, in particular the seibu doctrine. that volume edited by tim and i is in the publication of you have on you
science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations he has for himself. but look, i think part of that was because as i said earlier, we met a new mitt romney, we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan, which was his tax cut. i don't have a tax plan that is 4.8 trillion, i am not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a voucher plan, i love teachers, i think we need more of them. don't believe me, speaker gingrich was eloquent in the primaries, saying that mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> the president had 90 minutes, now, if he had done his homework and prepared, if he had actually studied romney, why didn't he say it? virtually every analyst has said, and even your deputy campaign manager has said the charges -- was made wrong. forgetting that for a second, the job of the president is supposed to be able to be competent and to stand up for what he believes in and articulate what is wrong. mitt romney walked over him. >> and alex, you mentioned the president is air born to the golden s
will be developed by a school teacher? >> yes. there's an entire line of science toys, encouraging girls to get involved in science. there's journals, online, interactivity way to get kids hooked on science. >> reporter: this comes from the d.c. area. word around. >> this is a travel game you can take with you. for older kids and adults. moves quick. it's a lot of fun. >> reporter: now let's talk about younger kids. >> this is an active game. based on disney fairies. you put them around the house. girls will pull one of these out of the bag. when you get to fairy, you run around the house and try to grab as many as you can. they're up and active. this is green toys, made of 100% recycled plastic. it's waterproof so kids can take it in the bath. not only can you control the car, you can play music now. i have all my songs downloaded on itunes. then i can open up the doors of the car and the car becomes a speaker. >> reporter: blue tooth from the device to the vehicle? >> yeah. you can drive it, may your music and it's kind of fun. >> reporter: really by moving the ipad around will steer the car.
baby. >> doing math with the gets? >> doing s.t.e.avenue. m. >> science, technology, engineering, art and math. >> hey, do you do "gangnam style." >> what does that mean? >> gangnam sfooil? >> psy. the horse dance. >> the horse dance. >> you got it. >> like that. >> there we go. >> oh, yeah. oh, yeah. ♪ >> almost as good as david gregory. >> you name, it elmo can do it. >> there we go. >> that was fantastic. >> let's talk about -- did you read the "new york times." >> yeah, "new york times." there's an article that the word really is overused. >> really? >> really. >> really. >> a whole article devoted to, that really? >> really. >> it used to be kind of like that's surprising, but now it's that snarky really? >> really. >> really. >> it has been overused. by the writers and shows to make that kind of funny turn. it has been a little overused. what are some other -- i'm actually thinking of like, you know, like. >> like, and, you know, i'm a complete offender. >> seriously. >> serious ly. >> really? >> what words are overused? >> elmo loves overusing love. >> oh. >> you can't overus
question. that is sort of as much political science at something else. a big political factor, i don't want to sound too nerdy about this, but the rise of computer aids for districts are, the members of congress, state legislatures have created congressional seats in the house of representatives that are all democratic, all republican. there are relatively few seats. we have seen a bunch of change in the past couple of elections, but that is very much the exception rather than the rule. some members of the house of representatives fear, figure primaries more than they fear general elections, by and large. thus, they gravitate towards the margins of their parties. that does not fully explain the senate. because you can't redistricted senate, but it has had an enormous impact on the state and that the state legislature level. in the more polarized politics that we have. i also think that the news media plays a role in this. it used to be that there was a kind of shared set of assumptions and news. and everybody watches walter cronkite and they sort of made an effort to, you know, you could ar
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 334 (some duplicates have been removed)